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When the days seem a blur

by Madiha Kark

MEXICO CITY — Less than 48 hours before the final submissions, ask any student and they’d tell you there aren’t enough hours in the day.

Students spent their day with their subjects, getting footage for their stories or consulting with instructors on road blocks and creativity. Instructors met with the students one-on-one to help edit, shape the story and critique their work. Catch a few glimpses of the day here. Stay tuned for a blog post on the stellar Thursday night panel discussion on Ethics in the Media and field advice from photojournalists who shared personal and professional stories.

 

Michael Robinson Chavez helping a student with his story. Photo © Neal Jackson
Ron Haviv and a student go through images for the final story. Photo © Neal Jackson

Behind the scenes with Alice Driver

by Madiha Kark

MEXICO CITY — Meet one of the students at Foundry this year, Alice Driver. Dr. Alice Driver is a long-form journalist and an international speaker who focuses on human rights, gender equality, and migration in Latin America. She has received numerous prestigious fellowships and her work has been published in The New York Times, The Atlantic, Longreads Originals,  National Geographic, The World Policy Journal, The Guardian, The Texas Observer, Al Jazeera English and many others.

Driver’s project focuses on La Calle de la Belleza or “Street of Beauty” in La Merced. It is one of the oldest neighborhoods in Mexico City and was a center of sex work and commerce since the conquest. Today, women get all kinds of beauty treatments; like waxing, eyelash curling, eyebrow ironing, tattooed makeup and nails. She is interested in exploring the constructs of gender and beauty on this street particularly focusing on makeup tattooing and nail art.

Stay tuned to this space for more student stories.

 

Alice working on her project. Photo © Madiha Kark
A stall owner shows Alice the intricate nail art. Photo © Madiha Kark

 

Alice on assignment. Photo ©Madiha Kark

 

Alice photographs a woman filing her nails. Photo: ©Madiha Kark

 

 

A close up picture of the nail art. Photo ©Alice Driver

 

 

 

 

Day 3: Diving into the life of strangers

by Madiha Kark

MEXICO CITY — When one looks at projects of renowned photojournalists, it’s easy to assume that all photojournalists have brilliant minds that form amazing ideas. It’s easy to assume that they don’t have any difficulty getting access or talking to strangers or that they don’t have to work hard at their skill because they are already great at what they do.

The truth is that it takes a lot of practice to gain trust, convince people to allow a stranger to document their life. It takes courage to go out everyday and put your heart and soul into creating work that matters. Day three at the workshop and students experienced the rush to create a piece of work within the next three days. The pressure was palpable in the air as most students visited their subjects for a day of immersion and capturing the moments integral for their stories.

Adriana Zehbrauskas guides a student on her story. Photo © Neal Jackson

The evening presentations by Adriana Zehbrauskas, Rodrigo Cruz, Michael Robinson Chavez, Natalie Keyssar, Pedro Valtierra, allowed students to view current projects and a behind-the-scene of how the images were formed. The panel discussion that followed focused on how to work in Latin America, security issues and protocols. “We need to have a larger discussion on teaching young photojournalists on how to be safe,” said Keyssar, talking about her own struggles and methods to be safe when working in dangerous places.

In a jam packed hall, students listened in awe, taking notes and finding inspiration for their future stories and dreams.

Panel discussion on Working in Latin America. L-R Dario Mills-Lopez, Rodrigo Cruz, Michael Robinson Chavez, Natalie Keyssar, Adriana Zehbrauskas and Pedro Valtierra. Photo © Neal
Jackson

Day 2: Finding the subject and story

by Madiha Kark

MEXICO CITY — When it comes to producing content for any creative field, be it writing, photography, film or multimedia, we question ourselves. We question our skill level, our authenticity and our ability to create an impact. We ask, “What am I adding to the conversation that hasn’t already been said?” We worry whether or not a story topic has been done to death. For the students nervous about all these questions, Monday morning provided a solace, as instructors broke into small group sessions and discussed story ideas, creative road blocks and their expectations for the final projects.

Ron Haviv and a student share a laugh during a portfolio review. Photo © Neal Jackson

The instructors stressed how pictures do not have to be sterile and perfect. “Develop empathy and understanding and give each story the time it requires,” said Natalie Keyssar explaining the importance of developing trust with subjects. The classes were an equal mix of students with beginner and advanced skill levels yet the advice given by instructors applied to everyone.

In the evening, students showcased their portfolios with one-on-one portfolio reviews with some of the top photojournalists in the field.

Michael Robinson Chavez reviewing Erika Pineros’ portfolio. Photo © Neal Jackson

As the evening sun gave way to darkness, students shared stories over steaming cups of coffee and mulled over their project ideas. Sharing stories is what makes us human and dynamic visuals have the power to evoke emotions on a deeper level. It is this sense of friendship and family that binds the participants of Foundry as they explore new horizons within and outside of themselves.

Day 1 : The story begins…

by Madiha Kark

MEXICO CITY — On a slightly chilly Sunday afternoon, inside the patio of Universidad de la Comunicación, about a 100 students waited to register for the 10th annual Foundry Photojournalism Workshop. Students from as far as Colombia, New Zealand, Malaysia, Argentina, the United States and all over Mexico mingled over warm coffees, laughter and stories.

What started as an idea to teach visual storytelling to emerging photojournalists has blossomed into a community of mentor, peers and lifelong friendships. The relationships that form through the workshop transcend barriers of culture, language, skills and background. “People become friends and they come year after year,” says Eric Beecroft, the founder of the workshop. “It is like a family.”

Students arrive at the registration tables on the first day of Foundry workshop. Photo © Madiha Kark

Instructors Maggie Steber, Ron Haviv and Andrea Bruce encouraged students to treat their stories and subjects with respect and be open to ideas. “Nobody owes you a story, you have to earn it,” said Steber.

In a place so visually and culturally alive, Mexico City is the perfect backdrop to find stories. Students discussed personal stories, proposed projects and received tips for better storytelling from the instructors. The evening instructor presentations and panel discussions were inspirational for the students, highlighting topics such as safety, intimacy and work ethics in visual storytelling.

Mexico City is a labyrinth of stories and visuals, waiting to be seen and told. The task to capture the stories and represent them with honesty and integrity is what Foundry is all about. This is where the story begins…

Stay tuned to this space for more updates.

Juan Pablo Ampuda and Adriana Zehbrauskas speak to the Foundry 2017 students about safety in Mexico City. Photo © Neal Jackson

Natalie Keyssar

Natalie Keyssar is a documentary photographer based in Brooklyn, New York.

After receiving a BFA in Painting from the Pratt Institute in 2009, she pursued photojournalism, which fused her love for visual storytelling with her deep interest in youth culture, and political movements.

Much of her personal work has focused on the themes of class inequality, and the personal effects of political turmoil. She has explored topics from the intersection of subculture and gangs in Brooklyn, to occupied life in Western Sahara, from White Supremacist militias on the US Border with Mexico, to the Black Lives Matter Movement, from infant mortality in Burma to Hip Hop in Eastern DRC.  She is currently working on a long term project about daily life in Venezuela after the death of Hugo Chavez. 

Natalie’s work has been published by Time, The New York Times, Bloomberg Business Week, The Wall Street Journal, California Sunday Magazine, Le Monde M, and MSNBC among many others, and awarded by organizations like PDN 30, Magenta Flash Forward,  American Photography, Reportage by Getty Images, The NPPA, The International Color Awards, and The Association for Healthcare Journalists. She is a Pulitzer Center Grantee and a long term fellow with the International Women’s Media Foundation Latin America program. 

Anunciando los ganadores de las becas del Foundry 2017

Felicidades a nuestros ganadores de las becas para el taller de Foundry 2017.

Los ganadores son Danielle Villasana (EEUU), Tamara Merino (Chile) y Enrique Rashide Serrato Frias (Mexico).

Aquí, una imagen de la aplicación de Villasana:

Like many other countries worldwide, there is a stereotype in Peru that trans women are only capable of working as hairdressers or sex workers. Because of high competition for salon work and the need to pay for studies, many trans women are relegated to prostitution. Here Camila, left, gets out of a taxi after a long night of dancing.
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From the series “A Light Inside,” a long-term project exploring the life-threatening challenges that trans women face in Lima, Peru.

Aquí, una imagen de la aplicación de Merino:

Gabriele Gouellain, a German immigrant, waits in the kitchen for her husband to return from mining. According to the Coober Pedy district council, about 60 percent of the town’s residents are originally from Europe, having migrated to the area after World War II. Coober Pedy, Australia 2015.
Series UNDERLAND

Aquí, una imagen de la aplicación de Frias:

SCHOOL OF CARDBOARD.-
The educational gap in the Mexican republic is imminent, there are still schools made of cardboard, as is the case of the bicentennial elementary school located north of the city of Culiacán. Not having the right infrastructure for study becomes a problem that children suffer day by day, the heat exceeds 45 degrees Celsius, many times pay attention and learn becomes almost impossible; However, the most alarming situation occurs in the family. The lack of education and employment leads to one of the most serious problems facing Mexico, violence and drug trafficking.
Teachers in these times struggle for their work as the government seeks to enrich their ambitions with the new educational reform.

Announcing Foundry 2017 Scholarship Winners

Congratulations and felicidades to our full tuition scholarship winners for this year’s Foundry Mexico City workshop.

The winners are Danielle Villasana (USA), Tamara Merino (Chile), and Enrique Rashide Serrato Frias (Mexico).

Here is an image from Villasana’s winning portfolio entry:

Like many other countries worldwide, there is a stereotype in Peru that trans women are only capable of working as hairdressers or sex workers. Because of high competition for salon work and the need to pay for studies, many trans women are relegated to prostitution. Here Camila, left, gets out of a taxi after a long night of dancing.
///
From the series “A Light Inside,” a long-term project exploring the life-threatening challenges that trans women face in Lima, Peru.

Here is an image from Merino’s winning portfolio entry:

Gabriele Gouellain, a German immigrant, waits in the kitchen for her husband to return from mining. According to the Coober Pedy district council, about 60 percent of the town’s residents are originally from Europe, having migrated to the area after World War II. Coober Pedy, Australia 2015.
Series UNDERLAND

Here is an image from Frias’s winning portfolio entry:

SCHOOL OF CARDBOARD.-
The educational gap in the Mexican republic is imminent, there are still schools made of cardboard, as is the case of the bicentennial elementary school located north of the city of Culiacán. Not having the right infrastructure for study becomes a problem that children suffer day by day, the heat exceeds 45 degrees Celsius, many times pay attention and learn becomes almost impossible; However, the most alarming situation occurs in the family. The lack of education and employment leads to one of the most serious problems facing Mexico, violence and drug trafficking.
Teachers in these times struggle for their work as the government seeks to enrich their ambitions with the new educational reform.

Guillermo Cervera

Guillermo Cervera Calonje is a freelance photojournalist, documenting armed conflict and social issues for the international press such us Bosnian War in 1993, the rebel camps in Chad, the Tamil Tigers separatist militant group during the Sri Lanka Civil War in 2008, the gang wars in Caracas, Venezuela, the refugees and IDPs in Darfur, the rise of capitalism in communist Cuba, the uprisings in Libya and Cairo, Egypt in 2011, the daily life in Afghanistan, the methamphetamine addition in southern Washington, D.C., American gospel churches and European Arms dealers, war in Ukraine and the last conflict between Israel and Palestine in the Gaza Strip 2014, Ibiza crazy life and Mermaids in Florida.

His photographs are regularly published in The New York Times, Newsweek, Marie Claire, The Guardian, Paris match, Rolling Stone, La Vanguardia, ABC and El Mundo, EL Pais, MSNBC, The Wall Street Journal among others, and have been exhibited in galleries in Madrid and Barcelona, Spain.

http://guillermocervera.photoshelter.com/


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Peter DiCampo

Peter DiCampoPeter DiCampo (b. 1984) is a documentary photographer whose goal is to contribute his work to a dialogue on international development and perceptions of Africa. He began his career as a Peace Corps Volunteer and a traditional photojournalist — now, his work seeks to deconstruct that experience. He is a co-founder of Everyday Africa, the Instagram-based project that has blossomed into a global phenomenon, and he is a regular speaker in classrooms and workshops on media stereotypes and the promotion of localized storytelling.

He is a 2015 Photography, Expanded Fellow (a joint initiative of The Magnum Foundation and The Brown Institute for Media Innovation), a grantee of the 2015 Magnum Foundation Emergency Fund and the 2014 Photoreporter Festival en Baie de Saint-Brieuc; was selected to participate in the 2013 World Press Photo Joop Swart Masterclass; and was named one of the 2012 PDN’s 30 Emerging Photographers to Watch. He has received three grants from The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting and additional awards from POYi, The Photocati Fund, The British Journal of Photography IPA, and Magenta Foundation Flash Forward. His acclaimed Life Without Lights project on global energy poverty has exhibited in London, New York, Rio de Janeiro, Vienna, Hannover (Germany), and Lagos.

Peter is co-creator of Everyday Africa, a project focused on daily-life images from across the continent to refute the stereotypical media image of Africa. Shot entirely on smartphones, Everyday Africa has over 275,000 followers on Instagram and has been featured by National Geographic, The New York Times, The New Yorker, Newsweek (Japan), Bloomberg Businessweek, and Around the World with Christiane Amanpour on ABC News, among others.

Additionally, Peter’s photography and multimedia work have been published by TIME, Newsweek, Vanity Fair, The Wall Street Journal, Le Monde, GEO, Foreign Policy Magazine, Mother Jones, Wired, Al Jazeera America, Internazionale, Good Magazine, CNN.com, MSNBC.com, and The Boston Globe, among many others. His NGO clients include Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors Without Borders), Human Rights Watch, International Committee of the Red Cross, Save The Children, Oxfam, The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, The Carter Center, and the UN Food and Agriculture Organization.

Peter holds a BS in Journalism from Boston University, and he was a member of the VII Mentor Program from 2010-2012.

http://www.peterdicampo.com

Jodi Bieber

Jodi BieberJodi Bieber is best known for her photograph of Bibi Aisha, whose nose and ears were cut off by her husband. She was punished for running away from him in Afghanistan. It won the Premier Award at the World Press Awards in 2010. However, she spends most of her time creating challenging projects that often confront what is presented in traditional main stream media and her projects are then exhibited around the world. She has three monographs and loves teaching passionate, inspired students.

jodi bieber – photographer

 

James Oatway

James-OatwayJames Oatway is an independent South African photographer. The former Chief Photographer of the Sunday Times newspaper, he recently quit to pursue his dreams as a freelancer. He has covered many important stories in South Africa and abroad, but has a special interest in telling under reported stories in Africa. In 2015 he photographed a fatal attack by South African men on Mozambican migrant Emmanuel Sithole. The images of the attack sparked outrage and made international headlines.

http://www.jamesoatway.com

 

Charlie Shoemaker

Charlie ShoemakerCharlie Shoemaker is an award-winning documentary photographer based in Cape Town, South Africa. Prior to his time in South Africa, Charlie spent over a year living in Uganda covering East Africa. In 2014, he was named one of Magnum Photo’s 30 under 30.

In 2015 Charlie was awarded the Magenta Foundation’s Flash Forward’s Bright Spark Award for an on-going body of work documenting a community in the Cape flat’s that are battle to cope with some of the highest homicide rates in the country, widespread drug addiction, gang problems, poor education and high unemployment.

Charlie is also a contributor to the Everyday Africa project.

Instagram: @charlieshoemaker

Edward Echwalu

Edward EchwaluEdward Echwalu is a freelance Photojournalist based in Kampala, Uganda, with an extended reach across East Africa. A graduate of Journalism and communication at Makerere University, his work over the years has been published in distinguished media outlets globally. While he is biased towards social developmental issues, he continues to cover a wide range of breaking news stories. Edward is also part of an exciting crop of photographers based in Africa contributing towards changing the negative image of Africa in the West through the @everydayafrica project. A 1st and 2nd runner up in the CNN Africa Journalism Awards (2012, 2013).

Twitter: @echwalu

Instagram: @edward_echwalu

Website: www.echwalu.com (Going live on May 22).

2016 Scholarship Winners Announced

A young Daasanach fisherman guts and cleans a fish on the Eastern shore of Lake Turkana near the boarder of Ethiopia and Kenya. The Daasanach are Kenya's second smallest tribe with between 60,000-80,000 members. They are traditionally nomadic, roaming between the two countries although with continued drought over the last 20 years about 30% have looked to the lake for food and income in fishing. © Christena Dowsett
A young Daasanach fisherman guts and cleans a fish on the Eastern shore of Lake Turkana near the boarder of Ethiopia and Kenya. The Daasanach are Kenya’s second smallest tribe with between 60,000-80,000 members. They are traditionally nomadic, roaming between the two countries although with continued drought over the last 20 years about 30% have looked to the lake for food and income in fishing. Photo © Christena Dowsett – 2016 Scholarship Winner

Congratulations to the 2016 FPW Scholarship Winners:

João Castellano, Brazil
Christena Dowsett, USA
Nariman El-Mofty, Egypt
Kiana Hayeri, Canada/Iran
Shiraaz Mohamed, South Africa
Younes Mohammad, Iraq
Kevin Ouma, Kenya
Ray Ochieng Olewe, Kenya
Jonathan Rashad, Egypt
Rahul Shah, India

We hope to see all of you in Cape Town in July!

Scholarship entries were judged by Foundry instructors Adriana Zehbrauskas and Kirsten Luce.

Scholarships Applications Open!

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Applications for the 2016 Foundry Workshop Scholarships are now open

Are you dying to go to Foundry Photojournalism Workshop in Cape Town, South Africa this year but worried about being able to afford it? Foundry offers about 10 tuition-waiver scholarships that will reduce the entire fee of the workshop. If a student has paid the tuition fee and wins a scholarship, he/she will be refunded the tuition. You have until April 3, 2016 to apply.

Scholarships are not cash prizes. Scholarships do not pay for travel, lodging, meals, etc. The scholarship only discounts the tuition fee of the workshop.

In order to apply, please fill out the form at the following link: [gpp_button color=”green” url=”http://www.foundryphotoworkshop.org/scholarships/” title=”Scholarship Application” target=”_blank” size=”medium” display=”block”]Scholarship Application[/gpp_button]

Applications must include the following in one .ZIP file no larger than 6mb:

  • 20 images (photo essay, singles or mix of both)
  • Brief description of professional photography experience or photo education
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Foundry instructor Ron Haviv looks over a student's work in a classroom during the 2014 workshop in Antigua, Guatemala.
Foundry instructor Ron Haviv looks over a student’s work in a classroom during the 2014 workshop in Antigua, Guatemala.
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