Jen Storey

jen-storeyWorkshop Producer

Hi, I’m Jen. Currently, I am working as a teacher and administrator in public education. Before changing careers, I worked in marketing and public relations. I have been with Foundry since the beginning. It is a privilege to be a part of lasting friendships, awe-inspiring creativity and generosity. I look forward to meeting you. Namaste

Beverly Pecoraro

beverly-pecoraroWorkshop Producer/Registration

Beverly Pecoraro has been involved (and in love) with Foundry since 2009, when she was a student at the workshop in India.  She is a history teacher at Big Picture High School in Seattle, Washington. Her spare time is filled with travel, friends, yoga, music, concerts, films, volunteering at the Sundance Film Festival, good books, and anything outdoors–snowboarding, camping, and hiking.

Tiffany L. Clark

tiffanylclarkDigital Tech

Tiffany is a New York-based freelance photographer, originally from St. Paul, Minnesota. She graduated from the Documentary Photography and Photojournalism Program at the International Center of Photography in NY in 2007. Tiffany is currently working for amNY Newspaper and other publications in the city, managing ICP’s Digital Media Lab, teaching, as well as shooting social events and working on her own personal documentary stories.

TiffanyClarkPhotography.com

Hannah West

Hannah WestGrant Coordinator & Instructor Liaison

Hannah has been involved with Foundry since 2010. She works at the Walden School of Liberal Arts in Utah as a member of the Administration and loves the opportunity it gives her to work in public education. She enjoyed studying photography at the University of Utah then shifted gears to obtaining a bachelors in Anthropology at Utah Valley University. She loves music, hiking, painting, photography, camping and scuba diving, and doing yoga in her free time (and her dogs of course). Above anything else, she loves traveling. Foundry has made an enormous impact in her life and she grateful to be part of this amazing team of people.

January Sale – Foundry Cape Town 2016

January Tuition Sale
Kirsten Luce, a Foundry instructor and staff member, reviews images from her class in Antigua, Guatemala at Foundry 2014.

Save $100 or $50 from the price of Foundry Photojournalism Workshop in Cape Town, South Africa. Throughout January 2016, you can take off $100.00 USD (or $50.00 if you are from the local/regional list; see below)

* Local/regional students must be someone whose country of origin/birthplace is on the African continent. Also included are people whose country of origin is from the following countries: Brunei, Cambodia, Christmas Island, Malaysia, East Timor, Indonesia, Laos, Myanmar (Burma), Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam.


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Maggie Steber

Maggie Steber has worked as a documentary photographer in 60 countries. Her longtime work in Haiti received the prestigious Alicia Patterson Foundation Grant and the Ernst Haas Grant. A collection of the Haiti photographs was published in “Dancing on Fire: Photographs from Haiti”, by Aperture. She was a contract photographer for Newsweek Magazine for 4 years and has worked for several press agencies as well as the Associated Press in New York as a photo editor. She served as Asst. Managing Editor of Photography and Features at the Miami Herald from 1999-2002 and guided the photo staff projects to twice become Pulitzer Prize finalists and a third time as winner. In 2007, she received a grant from the Knight Foundation to design a new newspaper prototype through the new Knight Center for International Media at the University of Miami. In 2010, for the 3rd time, she will be invited as one of the Master Teachers at the World Press Photo Foundation’s Joop Swart classes. In 2008, she was honored guest speaker at the formal gathering of distinguished guests in Amstesrdam.

Steber was distinguished invited guest in 2008 to the Pingyao Photo Festival where she exhibited her longtime work on Native Americans and made the main evening presentation. That exhibition was her 3rd in China. She has exhibited twice at Visa Pour L’Image in Perpignan, France and at the Jardins du Luxumbourg in Paris as part of the 20th anniversary exhibition of Reporters Sans Frontieres. She has exhibited widely throughout the US and the world.

Maggie’s breathtaking list of honors includes:

  • The Leica Medal of Excellence
  • First Prize Spot News World Press Photo Foundation News
  • First Prize Magazine Documentary in Pictures of the Year (iPOY)
  • Overseas Press Oliver Rebbot Award Best Photographic Coverage from Abroad
  • The Medal of Honor for Distinguished Service to Journalism from University of Missouri
  • Grants: Alicia Patterson Foundation, the Ernst Haas Grant and the Knight Foundation; 3-time finalist for Eugene Smith Grant for Humanistic Photography

Her work appears regularly in National Geographic Magazine, The New York Times, Smithsonian, The Guardian of London and many other American and European publications. Her photographs are widely exhibited and are included in many museum and private collections. She has served as judge for World Press Photo Foundation and the Alicia Patterson Foundation four times each, as well as for other photographic competitions.

 


CLASS DESCRIPTION

Images have the power to pen eyes, evoke emotions and instigate change. Students will discover new and innovative ways to create and share stories through research and class discussion of ideas, daily shooting, and critiques of the work done at the workshop. Students should bring portfolios, bodies of work in progress, or recently finished if possible as Maggie would like to see this work too. Participants conclude this workshop with new compelling images and ideas that reflect original thinking and vision, as well as plans for how to present the work.

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Tewfic El-Sawy

The Travel Documentary: Sound & Image

with Tewfic El-Sawy

This will be a multimedia class that allows its participants to concentrate on the story, rather than on the application. The purpose and aim of the class is to show photographers how to make quick work of slide show production (rivaling in content and quality the more complicated processes), using their own images and audio generated in the field, to produce a cogent travel documentary under the simulation of publishing deadlines. Half of the class’s time will be spent photographing in the field, while indoors time will be devoted to weaving the material into photo stories. Requirements for the class are Soundslides (free trial version available), Audacity (free audio editing program) and an audio digital recorder or an iPhone (or equivalent) audio recording app ( free Tascam PCM Recorder as an example).

Kael Alford & Thorne Anderson

Poetic Multimedia: Your voice in storytelling

with Kael Alford & Thorne Anderson

Multimedia storytelling can have the same power, intimacy and poetry as still photography. In this class we will help you bring a sophisticated photography aesthetic to your multimedia production. Students will produce stories that rely on strong still images with the added dimensions of moving images and audio to give greater voice to their subjects. You will learn how to frame and shoot lyrical video using motion as a composition device, how to conduct and edit useful audio interviews, and how to edit short multimedia videos using Final Cut Pro X. Students may work with traditional or experimental narrative styles. Your instructors have produced multimedia from conflict zones to back yards and have curated multimedia for editorial clients, museums, and gallery installations. We’ll discuss how to add video and audio without losing your voice as a still photographer, how to economize your video shooting to tell effective narratives, and how to record and edit audio and video by professional standards. This course is well suited to students looking to add creative audio and video skills to their photography repertoire, while maintaining their personal voice.

Students should arrive with DSLR cameras with video capability, audio recorders and ideally, tripods. Laptop computers with Final Cut Pro X are essential. Please contact faculty in advance for questions about affordable equipment, trial software, and tricking out your kit. We’re here to help make this possible and economical: kaelalford@gmail.com, thorneanderson@gmail.com

Here are some examples of recent student work, produced by Thorne Anderson’s students: http://heartofmexicostories.com/2014/

And a video piece produced by Kael Alford, to accompany a photography book and exhibition commissioned by the High Museum of Art in Atlanta (Bottom of da Boot: Louisiana’s Disappearing Coast): https://vimeo.com/91529537

See photography from Iraq by both Kael and Thorne here: http://www.unembedded.com

Adriana Zehbrauskas & Paula Bronstein

With Adriana Zehbrauskas & Paula Bronstein

Adriana and Paula will be team teaching to help every participant in our class make that quantum leap in their own evolution as a photographer no matter what level you are at. Together we aim to build confidence and help you learn how to approach and engage with your subject to reveal an intimate view of their lives. I We want you to excel in your story telling abilities and your editing skills so we review your progression each day and encourage you to develop your personal style and vision.

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Henrik Kastenskov

Web Documentary

With Henrik Kastenskov

Have you ever had the experience of watching a story online just to click away before it was finished?
Of course you have. But did you ever stop to wonder why?
This class is about telling the story the right way – a way that will keep your audience glued to the screen and at the same time teach you to become a Storyteller for real.

Meeting your audience where they are, on the Internet, means changing your focus, your workflow and your attention without changing what really matters, namely great photography. It also means adding a new set of skills to your toolbox and working when everybody else is hanging out in the bar.
Expect a lot of hard work, a lot of fun – and massive amounts of pressure, that taps right into the core of why you wanted to become a photojournalist in the first place.

You will need to bring your lap top with Final Cut Pro X installed, a DSLR camera with video capability and an audio recorder.

Matt Black & James Whitlow Delano

Personal Vision in the Public World

With James Whitlow Delano and Matt Black

The challenge for every photographer is to find your own path and develop your own unique way of visual storytelling; in short, to produce one-­of­-a­-kind work that illuminates your subject through a powerful and authentic personal vision. In this workshop, James Whitlow Delano and Matt Black will offer personalized instruction on how to create a project and bring it to fruition. Participants will propose a story idea, go out and shoot daily, receive daily critiques and editing advice individually, and through class discussions.

In this workshop James and Matt will focus on building concrete strategies towards developing your ideas, deepening themes, and establishing an ongoing visual dialogue with your subject. Also, to work on a global level, photographers need to develop new survival and technical skills; and understand current trends in international journalism.

We will discuss global trends in photography, share personal projects and back ­stories behind the making of a photo essay and the challenge of full immersion in diverse places and cultures. We will talk about the different process when producing a successful multimedia project. The emphasis will be to offer participants strategies for creating photo essays that stand apart from the masses of images bombarding viewers every day. Your documentary style can be instantly recognizable.

John Stanmeyer

John Stanmeyer by Rob Becker-Watermark2

John Stanmeyer is a photojournalist and humanist dedicated to social and political issues that define our times.

Over the last decade, John has worked nearly exclusively with National Geographic magazine, producing over 12 stories for the magazine and resulting in 10 covers. Between 1998 and 2008, John was a contract photographer for Time magazine, during which time he photographed the war in Afghanistan, the fight for independence in East Timor, the fall of Suharto in Indonesia, and other significant world news events. His years with Time resulted in 18 covers of the magazine.

In 2001, he cofound with six of the world’s leading photojournalists the VII Photo agency. By 2005 VII was listed in third position in American Photo’s “100 Most Important People in Photography.” VII now represents 20 of the world’s preeminent photojournalists whose careers span 35 years of world history.

January 2015, Stanmeyer became a VII Distinguished Member. The same month, John brought his ten years of stories with National Geographic to Nat Geo Creative while his historic archive of 20+ years of visual history remains at VII.

He is the recipient of numerous honors, including the prestigious Robert Capa award (Overseas Press Club), Magazine Photographer of the Year (POYi), and numerous World Press, Picture of the Year and NPPA awards. In 2008, his National Geographic cover story on global malaria received the National Magazine Award. In 2012 was nominated for an Emmy with the VII documentary film series, Starved for Attention and in 2014 was the recipient of the World Press Photo award for his photograph from Djibouti titled, Signal.

John has published a number of books including Island of the Spirits, a journalistic/anthropologic look at Balinese culture documented during the five years he lived on the island. His latest book, a VII Photo Agency collaboration titled Questions Without Answers (Phaidon), was released in 2012, chronically the last 30 years of social conflict and change around the world.

In 2013, John opened Stanmeyer Gallery & Shaker Dam Coffeehouse in West Stockbridge, Mass, combining photography and education around his passion for brilliant coffee, wrapping the two around ethically procured, human rights-based direct trade coffee with the socials issues represented in his photographs.

Stanmeyer lives on a farm with two dogs and many fireflies over summer in the Berkshires of Western Massachusetts.

Andrea Bruce

Andrea BruceThrough documentary photography, Andrea Bruce brings attention to people living in the aftermath of war. She is a co-owner and member of the photo agency NOOR.

For eight years she has chronicled the world’s most troubled areas as a staff photographer for The Washington Post. She focused on Iraq from 2003 to the present, following the intricacies and obstacles of the conflict experienced by Iraqis and the US military. She also wrote a weekly column for The Post called “Unseen Iraq.”

Her awards include top honors from the White House News Photographers Association (where she has been named Photographer of the Year four times), several awards from the International Pictures of the Year contest, and the prestigious John Faber award from the Overseas Press Club in New York.

She has also been a finalist for The Aftermath Project grant and a 2011 recipient of the Alicia Patterson Foundation Fellowship. In 2010 she received the WHNPA grant for her work in Ingushetia.

In 2012, she was the recipient of the first Chris Hondros Fund Award for the “commitment, willingness and sacrifice shown in her work.”

Andrea currently splits her time between Afghanistan the United States and is available for photography and multimedia assignments.

www.andreabruce.com


 

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Top 5 Books to Read Before Going to Foundry Guatemala

Guest post by Foundry instructor Victor J. Blue

I am psyched to be heading back to Guatemala and to meeting all of the students and faculty at this years Foundry Workshop there. It’s going to be great. Guatemala is an incredible country that I have been trying to understand for about 12 years now. It is possessed of a resilient, dynamic people and a difficult, tragic history. The war years, the massacres and the repression of the indigenous majority, and the years of fighting for justice and the reclamation of historical memory are the defining events of Guatemala’s modern history. There isn’t much that happens there now that isn’t colored by them. It can be hard to wrap your mind around all of it, but it’s important to try. Here are a few of my favorite resources for getting into Guatemala:

1. The Long Night of the White Chickens by Francisco Goldman

Long Night of White ChickensGoldman is one of our best American authors. Half Guatemalan, he explores his divided heritage and the fear and suspicion and intrigue of the war years in this novel. When people ask me what Guatemala is like, I give them this novel to read. As a boy, the main character Roger, falls for his Guatemalan nanny then as a young man travels to Guatemala to uncover the story of her death. The constant menace of the state and the intimacy with death that is so common to the Guatemalan experience make this the best psychological portrait of the country that I have read. And it’s fun to try and find the spots along the Sexta Avenida from the book. Extra points to whoever gets a drink in the expat/ CIA bar that’s still in Zone 10.

 

2. Guatemala – Eternal Spring, Eternal Tyranny by Jean Marie Simon

EternalSpringEternalTyrannyThis is the only book of documentary photography that comprehensively chronicles the civil war years in Guatemala. It’s one of the greatest works of photo reportage ever done. Closely resembling Vietnam Inc. by Simon’s mentor Phillip Jones Griffith, it mixes strong photography, excellent reportage, and unreal access to show all the sides of a fight that cost the lives of over 250,000 people. Simon was a young photographer who dedicated herself to covering the war in Guate- one of the only foreign photographers to do so. It very deftly lays out the major events and themes from the most violent and dangerous years of the war in the early 1980’s. She was unbelievably brave. There are three printings of this, I have all three. The original English version is out of print but you can find it on Amazon. The book was reissued in a brilliant new edition in Spanish a couple of years ago, and you can get it at Sophos bookstore in Guatemala City. If you are a photographer you really ought to own this book.

 

3. I, Rigoberta Menchu by Rigoberta Menchu

IRigobertaMenchuThe personal testimony of Nobel Peace Prize winner and indigenous activist Rigoberta Menchu. If you don’t have any previous experience or familiarity with the reality of life for indigenous Guatemalans, this is an important book to read. Menchu grew up in a persecuted political family and fled into exile in the 80’s and told her story to Elizabeth Burgos in Paris. There is no small amount of controversy around the woman in Guatemala, and if you feel like diving into, could be worth checking out David Stoll’s book Rigoberta Menchu and the Story of All Poor Guatemalans, or better yet Greg Grandin’s Who is Rigoberta Menchu? No matter who you believe, the fact is that she is a symbol for millions of indigenous folks and her story is in many ways emblematic of the struggles of Mayan folks in Guatemala for, lets face it, centuries.

 

4. Memory of Silence- The Guatemalan Truth Commission Report edited by Daniel Rothenberg

MemoryofSilenceThis is a new edition of one of the two vital human rights reports issued after the signing of the peace accords in 1996. It isn’t easy reading, but then the history isn’t easy either. It’s accessible and this new edition isn’t hard to get through. Read it, get sad, and figure out what you can do to make sure it doesn’t happen again.

 

 

5. The Art of Political Murder by Francisco Goldman

ArtPoliticalMurderGoldman returns with this nonfiction account of one of the greatest political crimes in modern Guatemala- the murder of Archbishop Juan Gerardi days after he issued the Catholic Church’s comprehensive report on massacres committed by the Guatemalan Army during the war. He goes deep inside a story that seems impossible to get to the bottom of, and keeps going deeper. This book is vital if you want to understand the impunity and disrespect for the rule of law that has created the ultra violence in the streets that Guatemala suffers from today. This story is an onion that Goldman peels back like a chef.

 


Bonus reading:

If you can get through one or more of these, you will have a head start on understanding the human rights context in Guatemala. If you have tons of time and read fast, then these are also worth checking out:

Bitter Fruit by Stephen Schlesinger and Stephen Kinzer – in case you weren’t aware the the CIA overthrew the popular, democratically elected govt. of Guatemala and all most of this crap in motion, this is a great history for you.

La Verdad Bajo La Tierra by Miquel Dewever – Plana A photo essay on the exhumation of mass graves from the war.

The Return of the Maya by Thomas Hoepker  – Photo book on the end of the war and the return of the refugees by Magnum heavy.

Our Culture is Our Resistance by Jonathan Moller – Moller was a human rights worker and shot incredible pictures of internally displace people in the later years of the war

Silence on the Mountain by Daniel Wilkinson -A kind of personal take on the end of the war and reconciliation and trying to unwind what happened.

La Patria del Criollo: An Interpretation of Colonial Guatemala by Severo Martínez Peláez – if you are really ambitious, the definitive account of Guatemala’s colonial history and the roots of it’s underdevelopment. (I am still wrestling with this one.)

 



 

Bonus films:

When the Mountains Tremble– Pamela Yates- this one from ’83 about Menchu and the war

Granito- How to nail a Dictator – Yates again, with an overview of the search for truth and justice in the aftermath of the genocide

Men with Guns– John Sayles- a fictional account of Central America in the war years. While not explicitly taking place in Guatemala, it’s pretty much Guatemala

Foundry students and faculty gathered in Istanbul, 2010. Photo © Neal Jackson
Foundry students and faculty gathered in Istanbul, 2010.
Photo © Neal Jackson

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